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How China Sleeps

How China Sleeps
Reuters

In today's growing cities, space is at a premium. In China, urbanites have transformed trucks, cages and desks into beds. Below, some photos courtesy of Reuters.


A migrant worker sleeps on the back of his motor tricycle, under a mosquito net with his wife and son, on the pavement of a street in Hefei, Anhui province. Photo by Reuters.


A former cage home resident sleeps in a caged-bed displayed on a street at Hong Kong's financial Central district as a gesture to bring public awareness to the poor in the territory. Monthly rent of a caged-bed, the lowest standard for a shelter in Hong Kong besides sleeping on the street, costs $150. Photo by Bobby Kip/Reuters


A child sleeps on a couch on a flooded street in Chongqing municipality. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam. Photo by Shi Tou/Reuters


Children of migrant workers sleep on a desk in a classroom at a primary school in Hefei, Anhui province. The education of the children of migrant workers, who number 240 million in China, is one of the top concerns of the Chinese State Council. The council also said that preschools are currently the "weakest" part of the education system. Photo by Reuters


A man sleeps next to his bicycle on a footpath along a Chinese alley known as a "Hutong'', during a hot day in central Beijing. Photo by David Gray/Reuters

Amanda Erickson is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic Cities. All posts »

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