Atlantic Cities

In Los Angeles, Walking Illegally Is More Than Twice as Expensive as Parking Illegally

In Los Angeles, Walking Illegally Is More Than Twice as Expensive as Parking Illegally
AP/Reed Saxon. Illustration by Quartz.

The city of Los Angeles is cracking down on pedestrians who sneak across streets when the traffic signal says “don’t walk.” But when you put a price on bad behavior, like being in a public street illegally, you see clearly what a city values.

The cheapest parking ticket in Los Angeles (pdf) is $58, and the one most commonly issued for parking in a prohibited zone is $73. Jaywalking—the term of art for a pedestrian crossing against the light—will cost you $197.

(Defenders of car travel may note that the penalty for moving violations like speeding or running a red light are generally much higher than the jaywalking fine, and also, incidentally, more dangerous.)

The push to punish illegal strollers is a reaction against LA’s downtown revitalization, which has put more people on the streets in a city designed for cars. It’s worth remembering that the auto industry invented the crime of jaywalking as way to keep pedestrians clear of roads they hoped to profitably fill with cars. That mentality clearly persists in city governance around the world, but crackdowns like this one could do more to reverse the situation than reinforce it if big penalties have city dwellers wondering why they’re not allowed in public streets.

This post originally appeared on Quartz. More from our partner site:

Image: Photo by AP/Reed Saxon. Illustration by Quartz.

Tim Fernholz covers state, business and society for Quartz. He has written for the American Prospect, National Journal, and GOOD Magazine and lives in Los Angeles, California. All posts »

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