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This 6-Floor Building Is Now a Giant Rubik's Cube

This 6-Floor Building Is Now a Giant Rubik's Cube
Javier Lloret

Spanish designer Javior Lloret has converted the exterior of a museum into a giant, playable Rubik's Cube.  

In his project "Puzzle Façade," a 3D-printed handheld cube is connected wirelessly to a laptop that controls the color projections on the building. With LED-lit media façade already built in, the Ars Electronica building in Linz, Austria, seems made for this project.

As if solving a regular Rubik's cube weren't hard enough, this larger-than-life version presents some new challenges. Since the handheld cube is completely white, it's harder to deploy memorized tricks. You can also only see two sides of the building at the same time. You can get other sides to show up by flipping the cube, but solving the entire thing seems all but impossible.

This is not the first time a building façade has been transformed into a game. Last year, student hackers at MIT converted a campus building into Tetris. This past April, Philadelphia turned the Cira Centre into a giant game of Pong

(h/t Core77)

Jenny Xie is a fellow at The Atlantic Cities. All posts »

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