Atlantic Cities

Town Pride and the Penn State Scandal

Town Pride and the Penn State Scandal
Reuters

Adam Geller of the Associated Press points out that the Penn State scandal cuts to the heart of the broader State College community. "Understanding the unique role that Penn State and its hometown assigned themselves in American collegiate life," he writes, "helps make sense of, if not the tragedy, then at least the tears and the outrage it has unleashed."  

Place forms a powerful piece of our personal identity. And when the soul of place is undermined, it can be devestating for those who live in a community.

As Geller smartly notes, Penn State created a unique indentity in football and beyond. It was centered around football for sure, but the team slogan of "winning with honor" permeated virtually every aspect of university and community life. That has now been shattered.  

Geller quotes a local resident, Kathleen Karpov, a native of State College who grew up the "Penn State way." She said she looked forward to her retirement in a place where formerly respected members of the community like Joe Patreno are your friends, neighbors and "family." 

"I think our entire town is bleeding blue and white," she told the AP, a phrase which once had a positive meaning. "Right now," she added, "it's the pain that we feel."

Photo credit: Reuters/Tim Shaffer

Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He's also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts »

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